Monday, 30.11.2020

Tag: Roman Imperial Period

Large Hoard of Roman Denarii Found in Poland

A farmer found 1,753 denarii in Poland. This is one of the greatest treasures of Roman coins in Polish history. The silver coins bear testimony to the last resistance of the Vandals against the invading Goths – and the catastrophic consequences of their flight.

Moving Mints?

In 1972 Konrad Kraft published a work stating that some of the imperial coins of Asia Minor had been produced by moving mints. George Watson questions this hypothesis by examining the coins of Pamphylia, Pisidia and Cilicia from the years between 218 and 276.

The New Coin Yearbook 2021

The updated Coin Yearbook 2021 is an independent price guide and collector’s handbook for coins from the British isles. The new edition features expanded sections on Britannia coins, Isle of Man coinage and the latest issues from the Royal Mint.

Agrippina: Ruthless Murderess or Role Model?

Agrippina was the sister, wife and mother of an emperor and was held in high regard by the Roman people. Despite this, there are few women in the history of the Roman Empire with as terrible a reputation as hers. But is that reputation justified? We investigate with the help of coins from the Künker Auction 341.

Researching the Lingwell Gate Roman Coin Moulds

Hundreds of Roman coin moulds were found in Yorkshire near Wakefield testifying the production of fake denarii. Today, they are dispersed over collections around the country. The Yorkshire Museum is running a research project on the moulds and their history.

Roman Provincial Coinage VIII Online Available

Volume VIII of the Roman Provincial Coinage series is now online available covering all Roman provincial coinages issued during the reign of Philip (AD 244-249). You can submit feedback for the printed volume planned for 2021!

Engraved Gems and Propaganda in the Roman World

Paweł Gołyźniak’s new book analyses how engraved gems cast light on propaganda and self-advertising actions performed by Roman political leaders. There’s a lot to learn for coin enthusiasts, too, as you can find numerous references to Roman and Augustan coinage.

Face the King

2,500 years ago, Greek artists invented portrait on coins. There was a reason for it: portraits were supposed to strengthen the loyalty of the ruler’s troops. After all, mercenaries should be aware of who brought the money. Andreas Pangerl is summarizing his history of portraiture.

The Origins of the Roman Empire. A New Era Begins

“We continue to live in the good old days of the Republic.” This is what Augustus wanted to convey to his contemporaries after the bloody civil war. But his completely new and high-quality coins speak an entirely different language, as Florian Haymann points out.

Far From Small Change – Ancient Gold Coins Donated to the Salvation Army

A lovely story from Christmastime, before coronavirus took over our lives: instead of the usual small change, two ancient gold coins found their way into a red Salvation Army kettle. The coins have now been sold by Heritage Auctions.
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