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Greek Coinage

The Punic Goddess

On Friday, March 13, 2015, Künker auctions off a Siculo-Punic coin with an enigmatic depiction: on the obverse we see a beautiful woman with a Phrygian cap. Is it Dido? Is it Tanit? Or is it perhaps a completely different goddess?

A King Named Teutamados

Beyond his name, there’s very little known about Teutamados. What we do have, however, is a splendid tetradrachm minted for him. Based on this, he was evidently a Paionian ruler.

The ‘Modest Aphrodite’ from Nysa-Scythopolis (Beth Shean) and Ptolemais (Akko)

A comparison between a statue of Aphrodite found at Beth Shean and a coin type from the mint of Ptolemais reminds us of the realistic nature of statues appearing on city coins.

Human Faces Part 2: Athena and Athens

Why is it that for centuries – or rather thousands of years – the head has served as the motif for the side of a coin? And why has this changed in the last 200 years? Ursula Kampmann poses these questions in her book ‘MenschenGesichter,’ from which the texts for our new series are taken.

Human Faces Part 4: Philip II as Hegemon of Greece

Why is it that for centuries – or rather thousands of years – the head has served as the motif for the side of a coin? And why has this changed in the last 200 years? Ursula Kampmann poses these questions in her book ‘MenschenGesichter,’ from which the texts for our new series are taken.

Ancient Sybrita: the mint where the most beautiful of Crete’s coins were made

The ancient community of Sybrita in Crete stills remains something of a terra incognita. That is even the more surprising given the fact that gorgeous silver coins had been produced there in Hellenistic times that celebrate Dionysos, the god of the wine.

Macedonia becomes a province

A rare Macedonian tetradrachm, minted around 147 B. C., tells a story from the beginnings of the Roman province of Macedonia. The rarity is to be auctioned off in the upcoming Künker autumn auction sale to be conducted between the 7th and the 11th October 2013.

Human Faces Part 9: The Battle of Macedonia against Rome

Why is it that for centuries – or rather thousands of years – the head has served as the motif for the side of a coin? And why has this changed in the last 200 years? This chapter of the series ‘Human Faces’ looks at the battle between Macedonia and Rome.

A Weight from the Empire of the Seleucids

A huge elephant is depicted on the weight that was auctioned off on 18th December 2013 in auction sale Gorny & Mosch 218 – Ancient Art. It is of interest not just to the art lover but to everyone concerned with ancient metrology. After all, both the shekel and the drachm is based on the mine, i.e. the unit represented by this weight.

A cownapper as royal role model

On 10 March 2014, an octodrachm of the Edones tribe will be auctioned off at Gorny & Mosch featuring on its obverse Hermes who, after just being born, stole the cattle from Apollo. One wonders why King Getas chose that scene to be depicted on his coins.

In our archive, we have made all of the content available which has been published since CoinsWeekly was established.

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